Cambodia || Siem Reap: Temples

I spent five fantastic days traveling with my friends, Ben and Jenae, in Cambodia. Normally we would plan our own travel, but AboutAsia was so highly recommended by friends that we decided to go on their Angkor Wat Without The Crowds Tour, and it was well worth it! Not only did we actually experience Angkor Wat, with out the crowds, we explored a great selection of other temples, spend a day in the country, and visited a fishing community.

More on that later. This post is dedicated to the temples.

We saw many temples, but only a fraction of the hundreds of temples (both discovered and unknown, rebuilt and still in shambles) that cover Siem Reap.  Our tour guide explained that those temples which are still unknown are left untouched because Cambodia is still struggling to remove the landmines left from the Khmer Rouge, which ended in the 1990s.

The below pictures are from our sunrise tour of Angkor Wat, the most well known temple in Siem Reap.  It is massive and beautiful, complex and still actively used.  It is the only temple we visited that was never left to fall into ruin.  Because of this, it is still in remarkable condition, even though it is around a thousand years old.

These photos are from a collection of temples:  Angkor Thom, Banteay Kdei, Srah Srang, and Ta Nei, and Bayon, and Beng Mealea.

This final set of snaps is from a temple famous for it’s usage in the movie Tomb Raider.  It’s real name is Ta Phrom and we were luck enough to hike back right after a rainstorm, so not only was it extra pretty, there were almost no people milling about.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s